Loading...
 

The Echo-cist's Halloween spook-tacular

Jim Stacy, creator of the legendary Star Wars-theme rock band Grand Moff Tarkin, switches off his power drill and stands back to admire a massive new prop created for his most ambitious project yet. He grins proudly as he gestures at the 11-foot high wooden skull.
"On Halloween night," he chuckles, "you'll walk through this to get into the Echo Lounge!"
With a production budget rumored to be five figures, Stacy and his colorful cohorts from the Black Cat Tattoo parlor will transform the East Atlanta nightspot into a spookhouse called "The Echo-cist," a reference to the 1974 horror classic The Exorcist. "It's gonna be the biggest thing in Atlanta this Halloween, short of the corporate haunted houses," says Stacy. "Not that there's anything wrong with those, but we're going for something more old-school, like a county fair spook show."
Although the details are being kept secret, Stacy reveals that among the Echo-cist's retro features will be a "girl-to-gorilla" transformation booth. Patrons will enter the club not through the front door, but through its side lounge. First, however, they must pass through an immense maze constructed in its parking lot. "Only after that," Stacy explains, "will they be allowed in, to deal with the mayhem inside."
That "mayhem" will include live music by acclaimed Atlanta punkers the X-Impossibles and by Gargantua, whom Stacy describes as "the Teen Beat equivalent to Iron Maiden." Also featured will be performances from Hillbilly Werewolf as well as the Pits, a Pennsylvania-based "horror movie punk band" that Stacy characterizes as a combination of the Misfits and Hasil Adkins.
Emceeing the festivities will be Stacy himself, in his alter ego as the wide-eyed horror host Dr. Crepula. "I've played Crepula before, but he took the year 1999 off because I was getting married on Halloween," recalls Stacy. "I couldn't subject my wife's parents to that!"
"The Echo-Cist" is held Tues., Oct. 31 at the Echo Lounge.





420 Atlanta
Cinco de Mayo
Mother's Day

Memorial Day
July 4th
2020 Calendar


More By This Writer

Article

Thursday July 1, 2004 12:04 am EDT
It was early in 1966, and filmmaker Sergio Leone had a problem with Two Magnificent Rogues, his sequel to For a Few Dollars More. The initial screenplay was a slapstick farce that Leone charitably labeled a "disaster." In desperation, Leone turned to dramatist Luciano Vincenzoni, who in 11 days rewrote Two Magnificent Rogues as a sprawling, picaresque epic about three men hunting for... | more...

Article

Thursday May 13, 2004 12:04 am EDT

When the Penetrators' lead guitarist Scott "Rip Thrillby" Rogers died last May, the world lost not just a tireless champion of surf music, but an outspoken devotee of Polynesian tiki culture. Friends fondly recall his enthusiasm for Trader Vic's, the exotic bamboo lounge he regularly frequented.

"Trader Vic's kinda became his living room," says Penetrators drummer Elliot "Sticks" Dangar. "He...

| more...

Article

Thursday April 22, 2004 12:04 am EDT

Lending new meaning to the words "Kid Rock," Atlanta musician John Boydston has carved a niche for himself with a series of retro-twang novelty CDs for children under the name Daddy A Go Go. His fourth disc, Mojo A Go Go, is another delightful assemblage of witty, uptempo tunes pitched at the 5-to-10 age group, but with definite cross-generation appeal.

A proud father of two boys, Boydston...

| more...

Article

Thursday April 1, 2004 12:04 am EST
Australian singer/songwriter Charles Jenkins won acclaim Down Under as frontman of the sparkling pop band Ice Cream Hands, where his Elvis Costello-ish lyrics swirled within upbeat jangle 'n' bomp. Bungalow, a solo album, finds the 'roo rocker in a quietly reflective mood more akin to the Costello of "Shipbuilding," Jenkins' voice little more than a gentle whisper over acoustic guitars on the... | more...

Article

Thursday January 29, 2004 12:04 am EST
Restless in L.A. commemorates 40 years of professional recording for guitarist Davie Allan, whose fabled fuzztone put the "drive" in many drive-in movie soundtracks. Among them is 1966's The Wild Angels, which showcased Allan's uncanny ability to mimic motorcycles with his instrument. Although this new CD contains a re-recorded rendition of that film's theme, it's just a parting glance in the... | more...
Search for more by Gregory Nicoll