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Get learnt with Aimee Chan-Lindquist

MODA Director of Development shares a bit of history on June 20.

Aimee Headshot (1)
Photo credit: Maria Royal
PICTURE PERFECT: Chan-Lindquist speak on the museum’s rich history, background, programs, and future excursions on June 20.

Founded in 1989, Museum of Design Atlanta is the one and only museum in the Southeast dedicated to the study of design and is committed to furthering the understanding of design through its various exhibitions and programs for visitors of all ages. Now, guests have the opportunity to hear MODA Director of Development Aimee Chan-Lindquist speak on the museum’s rich history, background, programs, and future excursions. After her talk at the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library event space, attendees are invited to continue the evening with wine. cheese, and the opportunity to view MODA’s exhibition, Making Change: The Art and Craft of Activism. The exhibition explores craftivism, the worldwide movement that artists and activists are taking part in using traditional materials such as yarn, glue guns, quilt patterns, and creating art to protest social and political injustice. This event is free and requires no tickets or reservations so if you’re into design or activism, this one’s for you! 

Free. 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Wed., June 20. Peachtree Branch of the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, 1315 Peachtree St. N.E. www.museumofdesign.org.



More By This Writer

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Article

Saturday August 11, 2018 05:00 am EDT
The Atlanta Summer Wine Festival returns Aug. 11 —  because there’s nothin’ wrong with getting a little boozy in summertime | more...
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  ["title"]=>
  string(27) "Hail to the original brewer"
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  string(6354) "It’s not hard to spot the classic craft beer brewer: Caucasian, chiseled features, dark-rimmed glasses and a scruffy beard. Red-checkered flannel sleeves rolled up to reveal geometric tattoos on his burly forearms. Lugging not one, but two oversized sacks of dank hops into the boiling batch of his next Double IPA. Although beer drinkers have grown accustomed to this familiar sight, it belies the historically feminine origin of the craft. And as more women and people of color are returning to the modern brewery, the craft beer industry continues to grow and diversify.  

Showcasing the hard work and talent of women in the brewing industry, the inaugural Dames and Dregs Beer Festival takes place on August 11, co-hosted by the Masquerade and Underground Atlanta. Luis Martinez, the festival’s founder and visionary, was formerly the tasting room manager at Orpheus Brewing, where he developed a respect for the curiosity and passion of female beer enthusiasts. 

“Historically, women were the original brewers,” Martinez says. “Men gathered the raw materials and women brewed the beer. Women are a true force — locally and globally — and this festival is about providing a supportive environment for their contributions to the beer industry.” 

Dames and Dregs Beer Festival will span all three Masquerade stages and Kenny’s Alley, showcasing craft beer and cider from more than 35 local and national breweries and three female-owned breweries in Mexico City. Female brewers and employees from local breweries have teamed up to brew special collaborative one-offs just for the festival.



Support groups for women and other nonprofits are tabling the festival, including International Women’s House, an Atlanta-based supportive service for victims of domestic abuse and human trafficking, to which a portion of the ticket sales will be donated. There will also be panel speakers on female entrepreneurship, business, and the brewing industry, as well as arts and craft vendors from female-owned businesses.

After working her way up from cleaning kegs and pouring beer in the tasting room, Second Self Beer Company’s Zuri Coleman has brewed professionally for three and half years.  She is a brewer in practice and on paper, holding a certificate in Intensive Brewing Science and Engineering from the American Brewer’s guild, and an outspoken advocate for women in the brewing industry. She actively works to establish a Georgia chapter of the international nonprofit Pink Boots Society, which supports and encourages women in the beer industry, and was one of the first guests on Atlanta-based Bitch Beer Podcast. She’ll be at the Dames and Dregs festival to promote Second Self’s beer, especially her brainchild, Margarita In Gose.

There’s a reason most brewers tend to be burly, hairy men whose rugged appearance might seem more suited for the job. Brewing is physically demanding work, and requires constant heavy lifting in harsh temperatures. “I will flat out say this is not a job for everyone, but it just takes the right people,” Coleman says. “That can be a man or a woman — it just depends on what you’re willing to do.”

As one of the increasing number of female brewers in Atlanta, Coleman worked hard to prove herself. Like many female beer drinkers, she still has to fight stereotypes in the male-dominated industry. “I’ve had a bartender bring my male friend a full pint of a beer that I recommended to him, and then bring me a sample because they didn’t think I would like it,” Coleman says. “Most of the time they expect me to order wine or some kind of fruity cocktail. It might feel like a waste of energy sometimes, but I think it’s important for women to stand up for themselves and drink what they want to drink.”

The practice of “gendering” beverages as a marketing strategy extends to those burly hopheads who might lose their beard privileges for bringing a “girly” cider to the party. Because cider is sweeter and fruitier than beer, it’s assumed that women favor it, though Urban Tree Cidery’s co-owner and master cider maker Maria Resuta says they get all types in their tasting room, including men. “We could talk about the psychological strategy of marketing to females all day. I think women are so much more complex today,” Resuta says. “Women’s palates are not defined by sweet, and I’ve seen so many women who look for hoppy and dry in their drinks.”

Resuta’s sister and assistant cider maker Jackie Waice agrees that “Chicks do go toward the sweeter stuff.” But in contrast to the sweeter American ciders, Urban Tree’s are based on English dry ciders, which are quite popular among men across the pond. Waice herself is a hophead, preferring Urban Tree’s bitter Das Hopps. “Out of our tasting room, our Classic is the sweetest cider that we make,” Waice says. “We call it a ‘semi-sweet’ because of the sugar content in it compared to American ciders. Women drink that like it’s water.” The Urban Tree Cidery team will be serving their new Rosé cider at the festival, in addition to their staples.



The sisters say that colleagues in the brewing industry have welcomed them since Urban Tree opened in 2016, and that it has nothing to do with gender. “I don’t view the fact that I’m a female as a negative or a deterrent by any means,” Waice says. “The brewing community has been very gracious to us, very receptive. If we needed help setting up something they came over, not a problem.”

After Maria’s husband and co-owner Tim Resuta minimized his shares in the business last year, Urban Tree Cidery became majority female-led, with Waice and Resuta leading the charge and running the daily operations. Now with two strong women at the helm, Resuta says the business can only grow in the future. “With the culture right now and everyone’s so focused on females, I think that our voices are being heard a lot more.”

Women, men, and everyone in between are welcome to share a brew together at Dames and Dregs festival. Just remember to raise a glass to the original brewer.

Sam Holt contributed to this article. 

$25-$45. 1-10 p.m. Sat., Aug. 11. The Masquerade, 75 Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. S.W., Atlanta. 404-577-8178. www.damesanddregs.com.__"
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~~#000000:Showcasing the hard work and talent of women in the brewing industry, the inaugural Dames and Dregs Beer Festival takes place on August 11, co-hosted by the Masquerade and Underground Atlanta. Luis Martinez, the festival’s founder and visionary, was formerly the tasting room manager at Orpheus Brewing, where he developed a respect for the curiosity and passion of female beer enthusiasts. ~~

~~#000000:“Historically, women were the original brewers,” Martinez says. “Men gathered the raw materials and women brewed the beer. Women are a true force — locally and globally — and this festival is about providing a supportive environment for their contributions to the beer industry.” ~~

~~#000000:Dames and Dregs Beer Festival will span all three Masquerade stages and Kenny’s Alley, showcasing craft beer and cider from more than 35 local and national ~~[http://damesanddregs.com/drink/|~~#000000:breweries~~]~~#000000: and three female-owned breweries in Mexico City. Female brewers and employees from local breweries have teamed up to brew special collaborative one-offs just for the festival.~~

{img fileId="7997" align="center" desc="THIS IS MY GAME FACE: Dames and Dregs Beer Festival supports women in brewing on Aug. 11. PHOTO CREDIT: Alicia Fortino." width="600"}

~~#000000:Support groups for women and other nonprofits are tabling the festival, including ~~[https://internationalwomenshouse.org/|~~#000000:International Women’s House~~]~~#000000:, an Atlanta-based supportive service for victims of domestic abuse and human trafficking, to which a portion of the ticket sales will be donated. There will also be panel speakers on female entrepreneurship, business, and the brewing industry, as well as arts and craft vendors from female-owned businesses.~~

~~#000000:After working her way up from cleaning kegs and pouring beer in the tasting room, ~~[http://www.secondselfbeer.com/|~~#000000:Second Self Beer Company’s~~]~~#000000: Zuri Coleman has brewed professionally for three and half years.  She is a brewer in practice and on paper, holding a certificate in Intensive Brewing Science and Engineering from the American Brewer’s guild, and an outspoken advocate for women in the brewing industry. She actively works to establish a Georgia chapter of the international nonprofit ~~[https://www.pinkbootssociety.org/|~~#000000:Pink Boots Society~~]~~#000000:, which supports and encourages women in the beer industry, and was one of the first guests on Atlanta-based ~~[https://www.bitchbeerpodcast.com/|~~#000000:Bitch Beer Podcast~~]~~#000000:. She’ll be at the Dames and Dregs festival to promote Second Self’s beer, especially her brainchild, Margarita In Gose.~~

~~#000000:There’s a reason most brewers tend to be burly, hairy men whose rugged appearance might seem more suited for the job. Brewing is physically demanding work, and requires constant heavy lifting in harsh temperatures. “I will flat out say this is not a job for everyone, but it just takes the right people,” Coleman says. “That can be a man or a woman — it just depends on what you’re willing to do.”~~

~~#000000:As one of the increasing number of female brewers in Atlanta, Coleman worked hard to prove herself. Like many female beer drinkers, she still has to fight stereotypes in the male-dominated industry. “I’ve had a bartender bring my male friend a full pint of a beer that I recommended to him, and then bring me a sample because they didn’t think I would like it,” Coleman says. “Most of the time they expect me to order wine or some kind of fruity cocktail. It might feel like a waste of energy sometimes, but I think it’s important for women to stand up for themselves and drink what they want to drink.”~~

~~#000000:The practice of “gendering” beverages as a marketing strategy extends to those burly hopheads who might lose their beard privileges for bringing a “girly” cider to the party. Because cider is sweeter and fruitier than beer, it’s assumed that women favor it, though [https://urbantreecidery.com/|Urban Tree Cidery]’s co-owner and master cider maker Maria Resuta says they get all types in their tasting room, including men. “We could talk about the psychological strategy of marketing to females all day. I think women are so much more complex today,” Resuta says. “Women’s palates are not defined by sweet, and I’ve seen so many women who look for hoppy and dry in their drinks.”~~

~~#000000:Resuta’s sister and assistant cider maker Jackie Waice agrees that “Chicks do go toward the sweeter stuff.” But in contrast to the sweeter American ciders, Urban Tree’s are based on English dry ciders, which are quite popular among men across the pond. Waice herself is a hophead, preferring Urban Tree’s bitter Das Hopps. “Out of our tasting room, our Classic is the sweetest cider that we make,” Waice says. “We call it a ‘semi-sweet’ because of the sugar content in it compared to American ciders. Women drink that like it’s water.” The Urban Tree Cidery team will be serving their new Rosé cider at the festival, in addition to their staples.~~

{img fileId="7996" align="center" desc="DYNAMIC DUO: Jackie Waice and Maria Resuta are the dames behind Urban Tree Cidery . PHOTO CREDIT: Alex Patton." width="600"}

~~#000000:The sisters say that colleagues in the brewing industry have welcomed them since Urban Tree opened in 2016, and that it has nothing to do with gender. “I don’t view the fact that I’m a female as a negative or a deterrent by any means,” Waice says. “The brewing community has been very gracious to us, very receptive. If we needed help setting up something they came over, not a problem.”~~

~~#000000:After Maria’s husband and co-owner Tim Resuta minimized his shares in the business last year, Urban Tree Cidery became majority female-led, with Waice and Resuta leading the charge and running the daily operations. Now with two strong women at the helm, Resuta says the business can only grow in the future. “With the culture right now and everyone’s so focused on females, I think that our voices are being heard a lot more.”~~

~~#000000:Women, men, and everyone in between are welcome to share a brew together at Dames and Dregs festival. Just remember to raise a glass to the original brewer.~~

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Showcasing the hard work and talent of women in the brewing industry, the inaugural Dames and Dregs Beer Festival takes place on August 11, co-hosted by the Masquerade and Underground Atlanta. Luis Martinez, the festival’s founder and visionary, was formerly the tasting room manager at Orpheus Brewing, where he developed a respect for the curiosity and passion of female beer enthusiasts. 

“Historically, women were the original brewers,” Martinez says. “Men gathered the raw materials and women brewed the beer. Women are a true force — locally and globally — and this festival is about providing a supportive environment for their contributions to the beer industry.” 

Dames and Dregs Beer Festival will span all three Masquerade stages and Kenny’s Alley, showcasing craft beer and cider from more than 35 local and national breweries and three female-owned breweries in Mexico City. Female brewers and employees from local breweries have teamed up to brew special collaborative one-offs just for the festival.



Support groups for women and other nonprofits are tabling the festival, including International Women’s House, an Atlanta-based supportive service for victims of domestic abuse and human trafficking, to which a portion of the ticket sales will be donated. There will also be panel speakers on female entrepreneurship, business, and the brewing industry, as well as arts and craft vendors from female-owned businesses.

After working her way up from cleaning kegs and pouring beer in the tasting room, Second Self Beer Company’s Zuri Coleman has brewed professionally for three and half years.  She is a brewer in practice and on paper, holding a certificate in Intensive Brewing Science and Engineering from the American Brewer’s guild, and an outspoken advocate for women in the brewing industry. She actively works to establish a Georgia chapter of the international nonprofit Pink Boots Society, which supports and encourages women in the beer industry, and was one of the first guests on Atlanta-based Bitch Beer Podcast. She’ll be at the Dames and Dregs festival to promote Second Self’s beer, especially her brainchild, Margarita In Gose.

There’s a reason most brewers tend to be burly, hairy men whose rugged appearance might seem more suited for the job. Brewing is physically demanding work, and requires constant heavy lifting in harsh temperatures. “I will flat out say this is not a job for everyone, but it just takes the right people,” Coleman says. “That can be a man or a woman — it just depends on what you’re willing to do.”

As one of the increasing number of female brewers in Atlanta, Coleman worked hard to prove herself. Like many female beer drinkers, she still has to fight stereotypes in the male-dominated industry. “I’ve had a bartender bring my male friend a full pint of a beer that I recommended to him, and then bring me a sample because they didn’t think I would like it,” Coleman says. “Most of the time they expect me to order wine or some kind of fruity cocktail. It might feel like a waste of energy sometimes, but I think it’s important for women to stand up for themselves and drink what they want to drink.”

The practice of “gendering” beverages as a marketing strategy extends to those burly hopheads who might lose their beard privileges for bringing a “girly” cider to the party. Because cider is sweeter and fruitier than beer, it’s assumed that women favor it, though Urban Tree Cidery’s co-owner and master cider maker Maria Resuta says they get all types in their tasting room, including men. “We could talk about the psychological strategy of marketing to females all day. I think women are so much more complex today,” Resuta says. “Women’s palates are not defined by sweet, and I’ve seen so many women who look for hoppy and dry in their drinks.”

Resuta’s sister and assistant cider maker Jackie Waice agrees that “Chicks do go toward the sweeter stuff.” But in contrast to the sweeter American ciders, Urban Tree’s are based on English dry ciders, which are quite popular among men across the pond. Waice herself is a hophead, preferring Urban Tree’s bitter Das Hopps. “Out of our tasting room, our Classic is the sweetest cider that we make,” Waice says. “We call it a ‘semi-sweet’ because of the sugar content in it compared to American ciders. Women drink that like it’s water.” The Urban Tree Cidery team will be serving their new Rosé cider at the festival, in addition to their staples.



The sisters say that colleagues in the brewing industry have welcomed them since Urban Tree opened in 2016, and that it has nothing to do with gender. “I don’t view the fact that I’m a female as a negative or a deterrent by any means,” Waice says. “The brewing community has been very gracious to us, very receptive. If we needed help setting up something they came over, not a problem.”

After Maria’s husband and co-owner Tim Resuta minimized his shares in the business last year, Urban Tree Cidery became majority female-led, with Waice and Resuta leading the charge and running the daily operations. Now with two strong women at the helm, Resuta says the business can only grow in the future. “With the culture right now and everyone’s so focused on females, I think that our voices are being heard a lot more.”

Women, men, and everyone in between are welcome to share a brew together at Dames and Dregs festival. Just remember to raise a glass to the original brewer.

Sam Holt contributed to this article. 

$25-$45. 1-10 p.m. Sat., Aug. 11. The Masquerade, 75 Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. S.W., Atlanta. 404-577-8178. www.damesanddregs.com.__    Sam Holt FEMININE TOUCH: Zuri Coleman of Second Self Beer Company maintains quality in every batch she lays her hands on.   Stay GOLD Can Release Party (itemId:150578 trackerid:6)                                Hail to the original brewer "
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Thursday August 9, 2018 05:00 am EDT
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Saturday August 4, 2018 05:00 am EDT
Top chefs from around the Southeast go head to head in another chicken wing challenge | more...
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  string(6666) "We’ve all been there. You’re at a brewery or a bar and ask the bartender which beer they recommend. They ask what style of beer you prefer and you fumble for an answer, while they proceed to rattle off things like porters, sours, pilsners …. After a few moments of pretending to know what’s going on, you wind up with something you’ve never tasted before.

Maybe you try it and it’s delicious. Maybe you’re not so lucky and you take a sip, trying not to scrunch up your nose in disgust. Or maybe this hasn’t ever happened and you’re the asshole that flaunts their knowledge of the infinite craft beer universe (you can stop reading now). Maybe you just committed the cardinal sin of bringing a case of Bud Light to a party, and were brutally mocked as a result.

If you haven’t jumped down the rabbit hole of craft beer terminology, you’re not alone. Is there a difference between a pilsner and an IPA, or an ale and a lager? The minutiae of beer and the sheer amount of different styles can leave even the most discriminating beer-drinkers with spinning heads. According to the Brewers Association, in 2017 the craft beer market brought in $26 billion, and it’s expected to keep increasing. So let’s start with the basics.

Ale vs. Lager 
All beer falls within two categories: Ale or lager. The difference can be noted by the senses — in taste or smell. Ales taste bitter and full-bodied, often fruity. To a seasoned beerdo, aficionado, or expert, the difference is not in the senses, but in the yeast that’s used to brew ales. Ales use top-fermenting yeast, meaning it ferments from the top-down. Ales ferment quickly and in warm environments.

Lagers are often described as crisp and light. Average Joes probably know the big brands: Heineken, Budweiser, Miller Light — those are all lagers. Just as ales brew top-down, lager is the opposite, fermenting bottom-up with bottom-fermenting yeast. They ferment slowly and in cool environments.

Now that we know the difference, here are a few of the most common ales and lagers.

Ales

IPA (India Pale Ale)

IPA’s are rising in popularity among craft beer lovers — yes, we know ATL bleeds Tropicália. Characterized by its high alcohol content and even higher amount of hoppy flavor, the IPA got its name due to popularity in British India in the 1800s. The emphasis of hops makes the beer’s flavor, aroma, and taste strong and somewhat bitter.

Atlanta breweries are teeming with IPA’s, and it’s common for breweries to have at least one on draft. SweetWater Brewing Company has several year-round IPA’s — from a tropical pineapple-laced Goin’ Coastal, to their standard IPA, they’ve got you covered. If you’re more of a hop head, Reformation Brewery continues the trend with two year-round IPA’s, Oren and Nolan the Wanderer.

Porters and Stouts

Simply put, a porter is a dark style of beer made from dark malt, meaning the malt is slightly charred or browned in production. The traditional English Porter was developed in London during the 18th century, and thought to have been popular among transportation workers in Central London — hence the name. The style is a combination of three ales: an old ale, a new ale, and a weaker, milder ale. Today, porters are brewed with a pale malt base and the addition of another malt.

The taste of a porter is more muted than a stout. The long-standing discussion about the actual difference between the two styles comes down to taste and geography. Stouts are essentially a stronger version of a porter with a few key differences. Stouts, with geographical roots in the Baltic region, are usually dark, sometimes even black, in color. The use of roasted barley gives the stout its characteristically dry taste, though this isn’t true of all stouts. The famous Irish Guinness is a classic example of a stout.

Red Brick Brewing here in Atlanta has a great porter for those who want to try it. The Vanilla Gorilla is a creative, handcrafted imperial porter made with a mix of several malts and Madagascar Bourbon vanilla beans, giving it a rich, creamy, dark flavor.

If you want to go to the dark side of beer and get your hands on a stout, Monday Night Brewing’s Whirling Dervish Coffee Stout is a good place to start.



Sour 

As the craze of craft beer has taken over in the past few years, the sour has emerged as one of the most popular styles. Which would explain why the sale of sours in the U.S. grew exponentially in 2016 and continues to grow, according to Time Magazine. Though sours are fairly new to our palates, the beer itself dates back to the early days of brewing. Originally brewed in Belgium in the early 1900s, before brewers could safely pasteurize brews, they were swimming with bacteria which produce acid, giving them a sour taste.

American brewers have found ways to safely produce sours en masse over the past few years. While most beer is brewed with a single strain of yeast, sour beer is brewed with an array of bacteria and wild yeast, yielding different, more acidic and tarty flavors.

Sours are a great beer to try if you don’t quite like the strength and hoppiness of other ales. There are tons of incredibly tasty sours among the Atlanta breweries. Three Taverns Brewery’s first canned sour, Rapturous, a raspberry sour ale, is a popular favorite among locals. Orpheus Brewing also has a great selection of sours — our recommendation to the sour newbie is the Noise and Flesh, available year-round on draft.

Lagers
American (Amber)
American ambers, or red lagers, are usually medium-bodied, less bitter, and hoppier than most lagers. These beers have a bronze color with reddish hues, hence the name. They have a caramel malt character in their flavor and often even in their aroma. Atlanta’s iconic amber, Laughing Skull, found at Red Brick Brewing, is a great amber to try. It’s sweet, mild, and it goes down easy. No nose scrunching necessary.

German (Pilsner)

They say the best beer comes from Germany. Or maybe everyone just thinks that, because of the German beer maiden. Who knows? But one thing is for sure: They have some damn good pilsners. A pilsner is a pale lager that was originally brewed in Pilsen, Czech Republic. Pilsners are characterized by high carbonation and tangy hops. The hops can leave a bitter taste, but not too bitter — pilsners have a bright, citrus zest that provides a light and crisp finish.

If you want to try a refreshing pilsner, hit up the BeltLine’s newest brewery, New Realm Brewing Co., and try the Euphonia Pilsner.

There you have it people. Go forth and drink."
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  string(7413) "~~#000000:We’ve all been there. You’re at a brewery or a bar and ask the bartender which beer they recommend. They ask what style of beer you prefer and you fumble for an answer, while they proceed to rattle off things like porters, sours, pilsners …. After a few moments of pretending to know what’s going on, you wind up with something you’ve never tasted before.~~

~~#000000:Maybe you try it and it’s delicious. Maybe you’re not so lucky and you take a sip, trying not to scrunch up your nose in disgust. Or maybe this hasn’t ever happened and you’re the asshole that flaunts their knowledge of the infinite craft beer universe (you can stop reading now). Maybe you just committed the cardinal sin of bringing a case of Bud Light to a party, and were brutally mocked as a result.~~

~~#000000:If you haven’t jumped down the rabbit hole of craft beer terminology, you’re not alone. Is there a difference between a pilsner and an IPA, or an ale and a lager? The minutiae of beer and the sheer amount of different styles can leave even the most discriminating beer-drinkers with spinning heads. According to the Brewers Association, in 2017 the craft beer market brought in $26 billion, and it’s expected to keep increasing. So let’s start with the basics.~~

::~~#000000:===__Ale vs. Lager __===~~::
~~#000000:All beer falls within two categories: Ale or lager. The difference can be noted by the senses — in taste or smell. Ales taste bitter and full-bodied, often fruity. To a seasoned ~~[https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Beerdo|~~#000000:beerdo~~]~~#000000:, aficionado, or expert, the difference is not in the senses, but in the yeast that’s used to brew ales. Ales use top-fermenting yeast, meaning it ferments from the top-down. Ales ferment quickly and in warm environments.~~

~~#000000:Lagers are often described as crisp and light. Average Joes probably know the big brands: Heineken, Budweiser, Miller Light — those are all lagers. Just as ales brew top-down, lager is the opposite, fermenting bottom-up with bottom-fermenting yeast. They ferment slowly and in cool environments.~~

~~#000000:Now that we know the difference, here are a few of the most common ales and lagers.~~

::~~#000000:__===Ales===__~~::{img fileId="7840" align="center" desc="PHOTO CRED: Courtesy of New Realm Brewing Company" width="400"}

~~#000000:__===IPA (India Pale Ale)===__~~

~~#000000:IPA’s are rising in popularity among craft beer lovers — yes, we know ATL bleeds Tropicália. Characterized by its high alcohol content and even higher amount of hoppy flavor, the IPA got its name due to popularity in British India in the 1800s. The emphasis of hops makes the beer’s flavor, aroma, and taste strong and somewhat bitter.~~

~~#000000:Atlanta breweries are teeming with IPA’s, and it’s common for breweries to have at least one on draft. SweetWater Brewing Company has several year-round IPA’s — from a tropical pineapple-laced Goin’ Coastal, to their standard IPA, they’ve got you covered. If you’re more of a hop head, Reformation Brewery continues the trend with two year-round IPA’s, Oren and Nolan the Wanderer.~~

~~#000000:===__Porters and Stouts__===~~

~~#000000:Simply put, a porter is a dark style of beer made from dark malt, meaning the malt is slightly charred or browned in production. The traditional English Porter was developed in London during the 18th century, and thought to have been popular among transportation workers in Central London — hence the name. The style is a combination of three ales: an old ale, a new ale, and a weaker, milder ale. Today, porters are brewed with a pale malt base and the addition of another malt.~~

~~#000000:The taste of a porter is more muted than a stout. The long-standing discussion about the actual difference between the two styles comes down to taste and geography. Stouts are essentially a stronger version of a porter with a few key differences. Stouts, with geographical roots in the Baltic region, are usually dark, sometimes even black, in color. The use of roasted barley gives the stout its characteristically dry taste, though this isn’t true of all stouts. The famous Irish Guinness is a classic example of a stout.~~

~~#000000:Red Brick Brewing here in Atlanta has a great porter for those who want to try it. The Vanilla Gorilla is a creative, handcrafted imperial porter made with a mix of several malts and Madagascar Bourbon vanilla beans, giving it a rich, creamy, dark flavor.~~

~~#000000:If you want to go to the dark side of beer and get your hands on a stout, Monday Night Brewing’s Whirling Dervish Coffee Stout is a good place to start.~~

{img fileId="7841" align="center" desc="PHOTO CRED: Courtesy of Sweetwater Brewing Co." width="400"}

~~#000000:===__Sour____ __===~~

~~#000000:As the craze of craft beer has taken over in the past few years, the sour has emerged as one of the most popular styles. Which would explain why the sale of sours in the U.S. grew exponentially in 2016 and continues to grow, according to ~~[http://time.com/|~~#000000:Time Magazine.~~]~~#000000: Though sours are fairly new to our palates, the beer itself dates back to the early days of brewing. Originally brewed in Belgium in the early 1900s, before brewers could safely pasteurize brews, they were swimming with bacteria which produce acid, giving them a sour taste.~~

~~#000000:American brewers have found ways to safely produce sours en masse over the past few years. While most beer is brewed with a single strain of yeast, sour beer is brewed with an array of bacteria and wild yeast, yielding different, more acidic and tarty flavors.~~

~~#000000:Sours are a great beer to try if you don’t quite like the strength and hoppiness of other ales. There are tons of incredibly tasty sours among the Atlanta breweries. Three Taverns Brewery’s first canned sour, Rapturous, a raspberry sour ale, is a popular favorite among locals. Orpheus Brewing also has a great selection of sours — our recommendation to the sour newbie is the Noise and Flesh, available year-round on draft.~~

::~~#000000:===__Lagers__===~~::
~~#000000:===__American (Amber)__===~~
~~#000000:American ambers, or red lagers, are usually medium-bodied, less bitter, and hoppier than most lagers. These beers have a bronze color with reddish hues, hence the name. They have a caramel malt character in their flavor and often even in their aroma. Atlanta’s iconic amber, Laughing Skull, found at Red Brick Brewing, is a great amber to try. It’s sweet, mild, and it goes down easy. No nose scrunching necessary.~~

~~#000000:===__German (Pilsner)__===~~

~~#000000:They say the best beer comes from Germany. Or maybe everyone just thinks that, because of the German beer maiden. Who knows? But one thing is for sure: They have some damn good pilsners. A pilsner is a pale lager that was originally brewed in Pilsen, Czech Republic. Pilsners are characterized by high carbonation and tangy hops. The hops can leave a bitter taste, but not too bitter — pilsners have a bright, citrus zest that provides a light and crisp finish.~~

~~#000000:If you want to try a refreshing pilsner, hit up the BeltLine’s newest brewery, New Realm Brewing Co., and try the Euphonia Pilsner.~~

~~#000000:There you have it people. Go forth and drink.~~"
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  string(7101) " Bottlecaps Georgia 051  2018-08-01T16:22:00+00:00 Bottlecaps_Georgia_051.jpg     How to identify different beer styles and stop ordering Budweiser 7839  2018-08-04T09:00:00+00:00 The beginner's guide to craft beer laureneleathers@gmail.com Lauren Leathers Amy Strang   2018-08-04T09:00:00+00:00  We’ve all been there. You’re at a brewery or a bar and ask the bartender which beer they recommend. They ask what style of beer you prefer and you fumble for an answer, while they proceed to rattle off things like porters, sours, pilsners …. After a few moments of pretending to know what’s going on, you wind up with something you’ve never tasted before.

Maybe you try it and it’s delicious. Maybe you’re not so lucky and you take a sip, trying not to scrunch up your nose in disgust. Or maybe this hasn’t ever happened and you’re the asshole that flaunts their knowledge of the infinite craft beer universe (you can stop reading now). Maybe you just committed the cardinal sin of bringing a case of Bud Light to a party, and were brutally mocked as a result.

If you haven’t jumped down the rabbit hole of craft beer terminology, you’re not alone. Is there a difference between a pilsner and an IPA, or an ale and a lager? The minutiae of beer and the sheer amount of different styles can leave even the most discriminating beer-drinkers with spinning heads. According to the Brewers Association, in 2017 the craft beer market brought in $26 billion, and it’s expected to keep increasing. So let’s start with the basics.

Ale vs. Lager 
All beer falls within two categories: Ale or lager. The difference can be noted by the senses — in taste or smell. Ales taste bitter and full-bodied, often fruity. To a seasoned beerdo, aficionado, or expert, the difference is not in the senses, but in the yeast that’s used to brew ales. Ales use top-fermenting yeast, meaning it ferments from the top-down. Ales ferment quickly and in warm environments.

Lagers are often described as crisp and light. Average Joes probably know the big brands: Heineken, Budweiser, Miller Light — those are all lagers. Just as ales brew top-down, lager is the opposite, fermenting bottom-up with bottom-fermenting yeast. They ferment slowly and in cool environments.

Now that we know the difference, here are a few of the most common ales and lagers.

Ales

IPA (India Pale Ale)

IPA’s are rising in popularity among craft beer lovers — yes, we know ATL bleeds Tropicália. Characterized by its high alcohol content and even higher amount of hoppy flavor, the IPA got its name due to popularity in British India in the 1800s. The emphasis of hops makes the beer’s flavor, aroma, and taste strong and somewhat bitter.

Atlanta breweries are teeming with IPA’s, and it’s common for breweries to have at least one on draft. SweetWater Brewing Company has several year-round IPA’s — from a tropical pineapple-laced Goin’ Coastal, to their standard IPA, they’ve got you covered. If you’re more of a hop head, Reformation Brewery continues the trend with two year-round IPA’s, Oren and Nolan the Wanderer.

Porters and Stouts

Simply put, a porter is a dark style of beer made from dark malt, meaning the malt is slightly charred or browned in production. The traditional English Porter was developed in London during the 18th century, and thought to have been popular among transportation workers in Central London — hence the name. The style is a combination of three ales: an old ale, a new ale, and a weaker, milder ale. Today, porters are brewed with a pale malt base and the addition of another malt.

The taste of a porter is more muted than a stout. The long-standing discussion about the actual difference between the two styles comes down to taste and geography. Stouts are essentially a stronger version of a porter with a few key differences. Stouts, with geographical roots in the Baltic region, are usually dark, sometimes even black, in color. The use of roasted barley gives the stout its characteristically dry taste, though this isn’t true of all stouts. The famous Irish Guinness is a classic example of a stout.

Red Brick Brewing here in Atlanta has a great porter for those who want to try it. The Vanilla Gorilla is a creative, handcrafted imperial porter made with a mix of several malts and Madagascar Bourbon vanilla beans, giving it a rich, creamy, dark flavor.

If you want to go to the dark side of beer and get your hands on a stout, Monday Night Brewing’s Whirling Dervish Coffee Stout is a good place to start.



Sour 

As the craze of craft beer has taken over in the past few years, the sour has emerged as one of the most popular styles. Which would explain why the sale of sours in the U.S. grew exponentially in 2016 and continues to grow, according to Time Magazine. Though sours are fairly new to our palates, the beer itself dates back to the early days of brewing. Originally brewed in Belgium in the early 1900s, before brewers could safely pasteurize brews, they were swimming with bacteria which produce acid, giving them a sour taste.

American brewers have found ways to safely produce sours en masse over the past few years. While most beer is brewed with a single strain of yeast, sour beer is brewed with an array of bacteria and wild yeast, yielding different, more acidic and tarty flavors.

Sours are a great beer to try if you don’t quite like the strength and hoppiness of other ales. There are tons of incredibly tasty sours among the Atlanta breweries. Three Taverns Brewery’s first canned sour, Rapturous, a raspberry sour ale, is a popular favorite among locals. Orpheus Brewing also has a great selection of sours — our recommendation to the sour newbie is the Noise and Flesh, available year-round on draft.

Lagers
American (Amber)
American ambers, or red lagers, are usually medium-bodied, less bitter, and hoppier than most lagers. These beers have a bronze color with reddish hues, hence the name. They have a caramel malt character in their flavor and often even in their aroma. Atlanta’s iconic amber, Laughing Skull, found at Red Brick Brewing, is a great amber to try. It’s sweet, mild, and it goes down easy. No nose scrunching necessary.

German (Pilsner)

They say the best beer comes from Germany. Or maybe everyone just thinks that, because of the German beer maiden. Who knows? But one thing is for sure: They have some damn good pilsners. A pilsner is a pale lager that was originally brewed in Pilsen, Czech Republic. Pilsners are characterized by high carbonation and tangy hops. The hops can leave a bitter taste, but not too bitter — pilsners have a bright, citrus zest that provides a light and crisp finish.

If you want to try a refreshing pilsner, hit up the BeltLine’s newest brewery, New Realm Brewing Co., and try the Euphonia Pilsner.

There you have it people. Go forth and drink.    CL File / Joeff Davis  BORN IN THE ATL: Lovin’ on local brews.                                   The beginner's guide to craft beer "
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Saturday August 4, 2018 05:00 am EDT
How to identify different beer styles and stop ordering Budweiser | more...
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Article

Wednesday July 4, 2018 11:52 pm EDT
Ring in a day of freedom at the Georgia Aquarium on July 4. | more...
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